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MSF responds to news that Gavi will release funds from pneumonia vaccine ‘Advance Market Commitment’ to first new product from a developing country manufacturer

Vaccines Press release Global

Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, has just announced that it will award part (US$75 million) of the remaining $262 million of the Advance Market Commitment (AMC)—a $1.5 billion fund that was launched in 2009 to pay for the introduction of the pneumonia vaccine in developing countries—to the Serum Institute of India, which in December 2019 received quality approval for the pneumonia vaccine. Until now, the only two producers of the pneumonia vaccine have been Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), who already had pneumonia vaccines at the brink of market entry when the AMC was launched, and have received the bulk of the $1.5 billion subsidy pot, on top of the base price for the vaccine that they charge Gavi.

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Access Challenges to COVID-19 Therapeutic Candidates

*Note: This briefing document offers only a shortlist of priority candidate therapeutics. This document will be updated on a regular basis and may not be completely up to date due to rapid developments. Please refer to the last updated date at the top of the document.

The global COVID-19 pandemic presents an unprecedented public health challenge to all countries in the world. Ensuring the availability and accessibility of effective medicines is one of the vital pillars to support the response and control of the pandemic globally. 

To date, multiple clinical trials are ongoing in different countries to test the therapeutic candidates for SARS-CoV-2 infection. This briefing document aims to provide an up-to-date snapshot analysis of the key access and supply challenges for selected promising candidate medicines.

Information in this briefing document:

  1. Background explanation of the exclusivity barriers that could affect access to COVID-19 therapeutics, including patents, data exclusivity, and policy and legal safeguards.
  2. Key drug information for selected leading candidates, including medical attributes, patents and other exclusivity rights, supply situation, and pricing.
  3. Colour-coded summary table of access risk levels for selected drug candidates, related to supply, manufacturing capacity, pricing, intellectual property barriers, and regulatory challenges.
coronavirus COVID-19 Technical brief research and development (R&D)
Health Promotion team provides information on prevention measures against COVID-19 at Amigos para la Salud Clinic, which is operated by MSF in Anzoátegui State Photograph by MSF
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To date, multiple clinical trials are ongoing in different countries to test the therapeutic candidates for SARS-CoV-2 infection. This briefing document aims to provide an up-to-date snapshot analysis of the key access and supply challenges for selected promising candidate medicines.

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‘Medicines for the Many’

A prescription for a more just access to treatment?

Whenever the topic of high medicine prices comes up, discussions often get very technical — buzzwords like ‘R&D costs’, ‘fair return on investment’ and ‘incentives’ are immediately thrown around.

While these terms come naturally to self-identifying policy geeks like me and we know the importance of these discussions, they risk blocking out the far bigger picture: the lives of patients.

Thankfully, every once in a while, a patient comes along to remind us and decision makers that while we debate the details of the perfect way to pay for medicines and conduct research and development, the status quo kills.

R&D Debunking the pharma R&D myth - 2013
26 January 2020
http://bit.ly/32VV85j
Blog Research and development Global

A century of neglect: challenges of access to insulin for diabetes care

An estimated 422 million people are living with diabetes worldwide. Prevalence has nearly doubled over the past 30 years and is now rising faster in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries.

Diabetes is a chronic, progressive disease that can be controlled with effective treatment. However, in many countries, people living with diabetes are not getting the treatment they need to stay healthy. In fact, only about half of people requiring insulin have access to it.

MSF works in over 70 countries worldwide and in most of these settings, insulin is often not available in public health facilities or private pharmacies. In 20 projects across 11 countries, MSF focuses on diabetes as one of the most common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in people receiving care in our clinics.

Diabetes Insulin WHO Executive Board Diabetes Issue brief diagnostic testsinnovationresearch and development (R&D)universal access
Sidra is a 12 year old affected by diabetes type I. She was admitted to Médecins Sans Frontières’ clinic (MSF) in Shatila Camp, South Beirut, almost a year ago, where he is provided with insulin pens. Photograph by Linane Saad

Why is insulin, discovered almost 100 years ago, not readily available to people who need it? A combination of factors, including high prices, challenging storage requirements and complex treatment protocols, all contribute to preventing access.

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Why is insulin, discovered almost 100 years ago, not readily available to people who need it? A combination of factors, including high prices, challenging storage requirements and complex treatment protocols, all contribute to preventing access.

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Burden sharing or burden shifting?

After a decade of strong commitments to fight the twin epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis (TB), a decline in international funding and the rapid shifting of the financial burden to affected countries is in danger of reversing lifesaving gains and causing an ‘epidemic rebound’ in some countries. To highlight this reality and the expanding gaps in the HIV and TB responses, MSF produced a report analyzing the financial and systemic challenges in 9 countries where it runs HIV/TB programmes: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eswatini, Guinea, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Myanmar, Zimbabwe.

Published ahead of the Global Fund’s 6th replenishment conference in Lyon (France, 8-10 October 2019), the report documents how international funding shortfalls and insufficient domestic resources availability are already causing wide-ranging gaps in HIV and TB diagnosis, prevention and care services; stockouts of essential medicines; and are threatening programmes targeting people with specific needs, such as migrants and people with advanced HIV.
 

HIV/AIDStuberculosis Global Fund HIV/AIDSTuberculosis Report
Lab technologists preparing sputum samples to realize bacteria cultures. Kwanele Dlamini (left), MSF Lab Technologist, & Nobuhle Matsabula (right), MoH Microscopist. National TB Reference Laboratory , Government Hospital, Mbabane, Swaziland. Photograph by Alexis Huguet
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After a decade of strong commitments to fight the twin epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis (TB), a decline in international funding and the rapid shifting of the financial burden to affected countries is in danger of reversing lifesaving gains and causing an ‘epidemic rebound’ in some countries.

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